Make a free will with Ashgate Hospicecare

People in North Derbyshire are being encouraged to a make a will this August as part of Ashgate Hospicecare’s Make a Will Month campaign.

The hospice has partnered with BRM Solicitors who are waiving their usual fees during August and instead they are asking clients to consider a voluntary donation to Ashgate Hospicecare.

The choice and amount to give is up to the client, but for a simple single will a suggested donation is just £75, and £150 for a mirror will for a couple.

Jack Wood, Head of Fundraising at Ashgate Hospicecare, said: “The past 18 months have been a challenging time for us all, with the pandemic making us painfully aware of our own mortality.

“Making a will is an important part of making sure that our affairs are in order and ensuring our loved ones are cared for. It enables us to put plans in place so that we can get on with living and make the most of the time we have.

“Ashgate’s Make a Will Month allows you to do that for free.”

Ashgate Hospicecare is an independent charity that provides free care and support to patients with a life-limiting illness, and their families across North Derbyshire, both at the hospice and in the community.

Currently, one in five people are cared for thanks to money left in wills, but as the number of people with life-limiting illnesses increases, demand for the services continues to grow.

Ashgate must raise £7 million over and above NHS funding, with the hospice reporting losses of more than £3 million in planned fundraising income because of the pandemic.

Jack added: “While there is no obligation to leave a gift in your will, or make a donation to Ashgate, we hope people will consider leaving a legacy.

“By choosing to leave money to Ashgate, you are helping us safeguard our future and ensure we can continue to support families in years to come when they need us the most.”

Supporters can make their will at BRM’s conveniently located Chesterfield office, with disabled access and free parking. In addition, free home, hospital and hospice visits are being offered to those physically unable to attend the office.

Jack added: “We’d like to say a huge thank you to BRM Solicitors for supporting Make a Will Month and offering such a vital service to our community.”

To find out more about Make a Will Month, and to make an appointment, go to: https://www.brmlaw.co.uk/ashgate-hospicecare-free-wills-month/ or call 01246 555 111

Five myth busting facts about will writing

The truth behind common misconceptions:

  1. I already have a will I don’t need a new one.

Even if you have already created a will, it is useful to keep it under a periodical review. This is especially true as your circumstances change, for example you get married, divorced, or move house. This is to make sure that it still matches your personal circumstances and wishes.

  1. Making a will is complicated.

Making a will does not have to be a complicated process. Once the process starts, people find it is not complicated at all. The process usually starts with a chat about your circumstances and wishes. The solicitors then do the hard work, drafting a will for you to sign.

  1. I do not need to make a will because I’m married, everything will go to my partner.

For some people this is true, but not for everyone. If you die without a will, then your estate will be distributed to surviving relatives in a set order of priority. How much you are worth and whether you have children are factors that will also affect the process.

  1. If I were to die, my parents would automatically gain custody of my children.

If a guardian is not appointed and there is no surviving parent with parental responsibility, then the Court decides who to appoint as guardian. You can choose who you would wish to be guardian of your children under the terms of your will.

  1. My children are the beneficiaries of my estate which means they can’t act as my executors.

Your executors are responsible for dealing with your estate on death. Even if your children are the beneficiaries of your estate, there is no rule against them acting as your executors.

Posted in Fundraising